Mets Season Continues Downward Spiral as Visiting Dodgers Win, 6-0 Behind Darvish

Published on: 5th August, 2017

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Me and Sandy Koufax
The great Sandy Koufax was at the game tonight. Seen here with Scott Mandel of SportsReporters  | read this item

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Citi Field — Back in March of this year, when spring training allowed most major league teams to at least, fantasize flights of fancy about their upcoming seasons, the Mets and their legion of fans had every right to look forward to the game scheduled for Friday, August 4th. It was the opening of a big series with the Los Angeles Dodgers, with both teams fully capable and favored to compete for a National League pennant in 2017. With the final third of the season starting now, these were going to be important games for playoff position played by teams with stars located up and down their respective lineups.

But, sometimes sports fans, you can’t always get what you want, you know?

The Dodgers came in with the best record in baseball, 76-32, and, up to this point, have clearly become the odds-on favorite to represent the National League in the World Series. The Mets, on the other hand, have been one of the biggest disappointments, sporting a 49-57 ledger. They have lost more than half of their pitching staff to injury, along with more than half of their starting lineup. They are unofficially out of the playoff race, unless the seven teams ahead of them in the wild card race (12.5 games behind) all collapse while the Mets play above .750 baseball over the remaining 56 games. It’s not happenin’, folks. 

Last night’s game was made even juicier by two new players, added to these teams in the past week.  The Mets finally brought up from their Triple A affiliate in Las Vegas, the highly-publicized and highly-skilled shortstop, Amed Rosario. Rated the number two prospect in the entire sport, much is expected of Rosario, in the way much was expected of Derek Jeter, back in 1995. 

The other personnel headline surrounding this game was in the person of Yu Darvish, acquired in a trade with the Texas Rangers, who was making his first start as a Dodger. 

There was absolutely a playoff atmosphere surrounding tonight’s game. More media, both american and international attended, Citi Field was packed to the rafters, the two big markets of L.A. and N.Y.C. were getting together, and Jacob deGrom, the Mets ace who has been nearly unhittable lately, was starting for the Mets. 

Too bad, you can’t always get what you want. 

Instead, tonight became just another opportunity to marvel at the Dodgers, the Goliath mashing all opposition in the National League.

“They’re loaded,” manager Terry Collins said before the game.

And, after the game, in which the Dodgers had outclassed the Mets, 6-0, Collins said, “They’re outstanding.”

The Dodgers are on some sort of run since July 4th, going 22-3.

Darvish breezed through seven masterful innings and surrendered three hits, all singles, and one walk. He struck out 10 while mixing pitches and changes speeds with tantalizing effectiveness through 99 pitches.

“He was pretty classic Darvish,” Jay Bruce said. “He’s got a bunch of pitches that he can use whenever. He just has the ability to create weak contact. He throws strikes, throws anything at any time.”

“I was really worried because the Dodgers have such great pitchers and I didn’t want to pitch badly compared to the other guys,” Darvish said.

Meanwhile, deGrom (12-5) labored through five innings — he wanted to go six, but was lifted for a pinch hitter in the fifth. He threw 99 pitches — 81 through the first three innings.

“My stuff was good tonight. I wasn’t able to locate it,” said deGrom, who allowed three earned runs, walked three and struck out eight. “Look at how many three-ball counts I had. And the mistakes I made, they hit.”

Like a 3-2 fastball to the game’s first batter, Chris Taylor, who smashed his 14th homer. Like an 0-1 hanging curve in the second inning that Yasiel Puig transformed into his career-best 20th homer. DeGrom gave up his third and final run in the fifth on a double-play grounder by former Met Justin Turner, who would have looked very good in a Mets uniform, along with his .360 batting average.

“He was off,” Collins said of deGrom. “This is two starts in a row where the first two innings he scuffled. We’ve got to get that fixed because 100 pitches in five innings for him, I don’t think I’ve ever seen it. He had over 80 pitches in three innings and those were three stressful innings.”

DeGrom left for a pinch hitter in the home fifth. 

After deGrom exited, it got uglier in a real hurry. With one out in the sixth, Josh Smoker walked Yasmani Grandal. Then every Mets fan’s favorite voodoo-doll target, Chase Utley, belted his seventh homer of the year to right. That made it 5-0. A walk, a double and a Turner sacrifice fly against reliever Chasen Bradford upped the lead to 6-0 in the seventh.

“You can’t make mistakes,” Collins said of facing the Dodgers. “And on the other side Yu was very, very good. They’re outstanding… Those add-on runs were tough.”

Rosario provided the crowd of 41,187, including about 15 family members, something to cheer in the fifth. He got his first home hit, a sharp single to left, and stole second base with one out. End of excitement, as the Mets went down 1-2-3 after him.

“This kid is very bright, very sharp,” Collins said of Rosario. “He’s going to be a really good, solid player.

Mets fans took solace in watching the kid shortstop, a rangy, tall rail of a kid (much like early Jeter) give a few glimpses of his athleticism and baseball skills, not to mention, his speed on the base paths. 

Unfortunately, on a Friday night that looked like it could turn out special for the home team, it didn’t. 

You can’t always get what you want. 

The great Sandy Koufax was at the game tonight. Seen here with Scott Mandel of SportsReporters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes: Dodgers all-time great Sandy Koufax visited the stadium, tonight. The hall of famer has been friends with Mets owner, Fred Wilpon, since the early 1950s when they both pitched for Brooklyn’s Lafayette High School.

 

 

 

 

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