Mandel’s Musings: Terry Collins, Mortensen and ESPN, Cano’s Next Steps

Published on: 1st October, 2013

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The media, particularly NFL partners like ESPN, are part of the cover up.   | read this item

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Mets re-up Collins for two more years:

Mets' GM Alderson gives Collins two more years.

Mets’ GM Alderson gives Collins two more years.

Let’s face it, TC deserved the contract extension. No fault could be ascribed to Collins for the lack of talent, the injuries, and the inability of the organization to bring in free agents to bolster a lineup of mostly quadruple-A hitters. The Mets organization has full confidence the 64-year old Collins, who has the energy of a 24-year old, can continue to motivate and cajole the Mets into an upwardly mobile position in the National League. Mets GM Sandy Alderson has been building a minor league system, step by step, based on the development of power pitching arms, and lots of them. It appears pitching at the major league level will be the strength of the Mets for years to come. Alderson’s job this off-season is to get Collins a legitimate 4 and 5 hitter for his lineup. Then, Mets fans may actually have something to cheer for from April through October.

 

 

ESPN’s Chris Mortensen discloses private information on Tampa Bay QB Josh Freeman, potentially damaging the players’ reputation permanently:

The smile should not fool you. Mort has no scruples.

The smile should not fool you. Mort has no scruples.

Mortensen is good at squeezing information out of his NFL sources, most of whom are coaches and general managers. In this case, he, along with ESPN, used terrible judgment, all for the sake of breaking a news story that should not have been broken. According to the most recent NFL collective bargaining agreement, any and all information regarding players’ involvement in the league’s drug treatment program is CONFIDENTIAL. By breaking the story that Mortensen probably got from a team executive, he may have done his job but he has potentially ruined a young man’s life. Does the press have any scruples? As we observe organizations like ESPN, the answer is evolving into a big NO.

 

Yankees’ free-agent Cano asking $310 million for 10 years:

Yeah, right. Good luck, Robby, and have a nice rest of your career with the Dodgers. Or, maybe the Cubs.

Cano didn’t deny seeking a 10-year, $310-million contract from the Yankees earlier this season, and that lofty jumping-off point for the five-time All-Star should put the rest of his potential suitors on notice as he heads into free agency. Cano, who turns 31 next month, represents a chance for Jay Z’s new agency, Roc Nation Sports, to plant its flag in Major League Baseball with the top rainmaker of this coming winter, so it’s doubtful he’ll pick a place like Seattle or San Diego, even if the smaller markets do scrape up the money.

 

Cano could be moving on to a new team this off-season

Cano could be moving on to a new team this off-season

But the way things already are shaping up, with the Yankees breaking off negotiations, it’s hard to predict where Cano might find greener pastures outside the Bronx. But the elite players bent on setting the market usually do, so here’s a glance at some of the teams with the financial resources — and the motivation — to make a move on Cano.

Los Angeles always seemed like the logical alternative to New York, and with the team’s new ownership group willing to outspend even the Yankees, money hasn’t been an obstacle recently. But at this particular time, cash could be an issue. The Dodgers already have close to $165 million on the books for 2014, with more coming through arbitration, and they have to start setting aside some money for Clayton Kershaw and Hanley Ramirez.

The Cubs GM Theo Epstein has the historical incentive to pry a star like Cano away from the Bronx and should be flush with cash to do so. With just under $50 million invested in 2014, the North Siders are due to bring in a marquee name — maybe two, if Joe Girardi decides to bolt the Yankees to manage his hometown club.

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